Food for thought

Hi all

Two games today.

North
Qxx
xx
AQTx
AKTx

South
xx
xxx
Jx
9xxxxx

Hoek started with 1, a lead-in to a strong NT or unbalanced with . I bid 2NT, showing a very bad, distributional raise. Hoek forgot about that one and raised me to the NT game. I explain to the opponents something went wrong, 2NT should have been alerted. They thought everything was fine, no director needed.

West leads a small and I warn Hoek: Go get beer, we have to make amends! Six tricks in and a repeated finesse in led to nine tricks, where the rest of the field claimed ten tricks in a Major suit contract for EW. I think I’ve spent all my luck for this year.

Another one:

West Dealer
EW Vul
North
KJ9xx
xxx
T98xx
West
xxx
Txxxx
x
Axxx
East
ATxx
AQx
AKQx
QJ
South
KQJ9xx
JT9xx
K7

I was sitting South and hear my RHO open 2NT. I have a nice holding, lots of playing strength, so I interfere with 3. This gets doubled and Hoek introduced his hand with 4. What’s that? At first I thought it would be a bad onesuited hand with a void in , but it was not meant that way, Hoek meant it as a three-suiter. He estimated his hand to be worthless in a contract and was looking for a better fit. Whether it was a good decision or not doesn’t matter.

Pressure bidding has high priority in my book, so I preempt on a lot of hands that for most people don’t qualify. But that also means there ought to be some agreements about running. "Partner, that’s not the right suit!" But how to get this signal across? Maybe you can get your one-, two-, and three-suiters sold via redouble or some unusual NT-bid. But that’s up to you, I have no clear answer ready.

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